How Molders, Shapers, and Casters stay on track

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Molders, Shapers, and Casters hourly rate: $17,04

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What is the job of the Molders, Shapers, and Casters

Mold, shape, form, cast, or carve products such as food products, figurines, tile, pipes, and candles consisting of clay, glass, plaster, concrete, stone, or combinations of materials.

Key tasks of the Molders, Shapers, and Casters

  • Read work orders or examine parts to determine parts or sections of products to be produced.
  • Trim or remove excess material, using scrapers, knives, or band saws.
  • Verify depths and dimensions of cuts or carvings to ensure adherence to specifications, blueprints, or models, using measuring instruments.
  • Move fingers over surfaces of carvings to ensure smoothness of finish.
  • Shape, trim, or touch up roughed-out designs with appropriate tools to finish carvings.
  • Lay out designs or dimensions from sketches or blueprints on stone surfaces, by freehand or by transferring them from tracing paper, using scribes or chalk and measuring instruments.
  • Cut, shape, and finish rough blocks of building or monumental stone, according to diagrams or patterns.
  • Drill holes and cut or carve moldings and grooves in stone, according to diagrams and patterns.
  • Select chisels, pneumatic or surfacing tools, or sandblasting nozzles and determine sequence of use.
  • Heat glass to pliable stage, using gas flames or ovens and rotating glass to heat it uniformly.
  • Inspect, weigh, and measure products to verify conformance to specifications, using instruments such as micrometers, calipers, magnifiers, or rulers.
  • Record manufacturing information, such as quantities, sizes, or types of goods produced.
  • Operate gas or electric kilns to fire pottery pieces.
  • Mix and apply glazes to pottery pieces, using tools, such as spray guns.
  • Raise and shape clay into wares, such as vases and pitchers, on revolving wheels, using hands, fingers, and thumbs.
  • Adjust wheel speeds according to the feel of the clay as pieces enlarge and walls become thinner.
  • Position balls of clay in centers of potters’ wheels, and start motors or pump treadles with feet to revolve wheels.
  • Move pieces from wheels so that they can dry.
  • Prepare work for sale or exhibition, and maintain relationships with retail, pottery, art, and resource networks that can facilitate sale or exhibition of work.
  • Attach handles to pottery pieces.
  • Press thumbs into centers of revolving clay to form hollows, and press on the inside and outside of emerging clay cylinders with hands and fingers, gradually raising and shaping clay to desired forms and sizes.
  • Pack and ship pottery to stores or galleries for retail sale.
  • Smooth surfaces of finished pieces, using rubber scrapers and wet sponges.
  • Pull wires through bases of articles and wheels to separate finished pieces.
  • Design spaces to display pottery for sale.
  • Verify accuracy of shapes and sizes of objects, using calipers and templates.
  • Examine finished ware for defects and measure dimensions, using rule and thickness gauge.
  • Maintain supplies of tools, equipment, and materials, and order additional supplies as needed.
  • Operate pug mills to blend and extrude clay.
  • Perform test-fires of pottery to determine how to achieve specific colors and textures.
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What other tasks a Molders, Shapers, and Casters may have

  • Brush or spray mold surfaces with parting agents or insert paper into molds to ensure smoothness and prevent sticking or seepage.
  • Engrave or stamp identifying symbols, letters, or numbers on products.
  • Assemble, insert, and adjust wires, tubes, cores, fittings, rods, or patterns into molds, using hand tools and depth gauges.
  • Clean, finish, and lubricate molds and mold parts.
  • Separate models or patterns from molds and examine products for accuracy.
  • Set the proper operating temperature for each casting.
  • Load or stack filled molds in ovens, dryers, or curing boxes, or on storage racks or carts.
  • Align and assemble parts to produce completed products, using gauges and hand tools.
  • Operate and adjust controls of heating equipment to melt material or to cure, dry, or bake filled molds.
  • Select sizes and types of molds according to instructions.
  • Patch broken edges or fractures, using clay or plaster.
  • Withdraw cores or other loose mold members after castings solidify.
  • Repair mold defects, such as cracks or broken edges, using patterns, mold boxes, or hand tools.
  • Measure and cut products to specified dimensions, using measuring and cutting instruments.
  • Smooth surfaces of molds, using scraping tools or sandpaper.
  • Measure ingredients and mix molding, casting material, or sealing compounds to prescribed consistencies, according to formulas.
  • Remove excess materials and level and smooth wet mold mixtures.
  • Operate molding machines that compact sand in flasks to form molds.
  • Place forms around models and separately immerse each half portion of a model in plaster, wax, or other mold-making materials.
  • Verify dimensions of products, using measuring instruments, such as calipers, vernier gauges, or protractors.
  • Bore holes or cut grates, risers, or pouring spouts in molds, using power tools.
  • Locate and scribe parting lines on patterns, using measuring instruments, such as calipers, squares, or depth gauges.
  • Tap or tilt molds to ensure uniform distribution of materials.
  • Study artistic objects or graphic materials, such as models, sketches, or blueprints, to plan carving or cutting techniques.
  • Carve designs or figures in full or bas relief on stone, employing knowledge of stone carving techniques and sense of artistry to produce carvings consistent with designers’ plans.
  • Carve rough designs freehand or by chipping along marks on stone, using mallets and chisels or pneumatic tools.
  • Guide nozzles over stone, following stencil outlines, or chip along marks to create designs or to work surfaces down to specified finishes.
  • Smooth surfaces of carvings, using rubbing stones.
  • Load sandblasting equipment with abrasives, attach nozzles to hoses, and turn valves to admit compressed air and activate jets.
  • Dress stone surfaces, using bushhammers.
  • Remove or add stencils during blasting to create differing cut depths, intricate designs, or rough, pitted finishes.
  • Copy drawings on rough clay or plaster models.
  • Place glass into dies or molds of presses and control presses to form products, such as glassware components or optical blanks.
  • Spray or swab molds with oil solutions to prevent adhesion of glass.
  • Blow tubing into specified shapes to prevent glass from collapsing, using compressed air or own breath, or blow and rotate gathers in molds or on boards to obtain final shapes.
  • Operate electric kilns that heat and mold glass sheets to the shape and curve of metal jigs.
  • Determine types and quantities of glass required to fabricate products.
  • Set up and adjust machine press stroke lengths and pressures and regulate oven temperatures, according to glass types to be processed.
  • Shape, bend, or join sections of glass, using paddles, pressing and flattening hand tools, or cork.
  • Design and create glass objects, using blowpipes and artisans’ hand tools and equipment.
  • Place electrodes in tube ends and heat them with glass burners to fuse them into place.
  • Operate and maintain finishing machines to grind, drill, sand, bevel, decorate, wash, or polish glass or glass products.
  • Repair broken scrolls by replacing them with new sections of tubing.
  • Develop sketches of glass products into blueprint specifications, applying knowledge of glass technology and glass blowing.
  • Superimpose bent tubing on asbestos patterns to ensure accuracy.
  • Cut lengths of tubing to specified sizes, using files or cutting wheels.
  • Strike necks of finished articles to separate articles from blowpipes.
  • Place rubber hoses on ends of tubing and charge tubing with gas.
  • Start machine units and conveyors and observe lights and gauges on panel board to verify operational efficiency.
  • Operate drying chambers to dry or finish molded ceramic ware.
  • Adjust pressures, temperatures, and trimming tool settings as required.
  • Design clay forms and molds, and decorations for forms.
  • Operate jigger machines to form ceramic ware, such as bowls, cups, plates, and saucers.
  • Teach pottery classes.
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Top reasons to use time tracking for Molders, Shapers, and Casters

Organize your paperwork and comply with legal requirements

Use Monitask for complete control over your employees' working hours and get information about the hours worked in the form of convenient reports.
Demonstrating the total number of hours spent each year helps support your business and increases transparency with your customers.

Receive more grants and investments

Proper time calculations will ensure that you have supporting documents and data to show when you apply for investments or search for new strategic partners.

Save on payroll and identify bottlenecks

Review daily timesheets and productivity scores to identify bottlenecks and ways to improve your operations quickly.
Implementing the correct time-tracking solution always results in reduced payroll costs for part-time and full-time employees, and companies can get more things done for each dollar they invest in their recruitment efforts.

Improve staffing and scheduling

Scheduling takes the guesswork out of the project's management.
By reviewing scheduling reports, managers can quickly identify efforts and estimated the workforce needed to complete the projects on time.

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