How Producers and Directors stay on track

Simple, detailed timesheets
Producers and Directors hourly rate: $36,73

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Annual savings

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What is the job of the Producers and Directors

Produce or direct stage, television, radio, video, or film productions for entertainment, information, or instruction. Responsible for creative decisions, such as interpretation of script, choice of actors or guests, set design, sound, special effects, and choreography.

Key tasks of the Producers and Directors

  • Write and edit news stories from information collected by reporters and other sources.

  • Plan details such as framing, composition, camera movement, sound, and actor movement for each shot or scene.
  • Communicate to actors the approach, characterization, and movement needed for each scene in such a way that rehearsals and takes are minimized.
  • Direct live broadcasts, films and recordings, or non-broadcast programming for public entertainment or education.
  • Coordinate the activities of writers, directors, managers, and other personnel throughout the production process.
  • Study and research scripts to determine how they should be directed.
  • Supervise and coordinate the work of camera, lighting, design, and sound crew members.
  • Confer with technical directors, managers, crew members, and writers to discuss details of production, such as photography, script, music, sets, and costumes.
  • Research production topics using the internet, video archives, and other informational sources.
  • Review film, recordings, or rehearsals to ensure conformance to production and broadcast standards.
  • Consult with writers, producers, or actors about script changes or “workshop” scripts, through rehearsal with writers and actors to create final drafts.
  • Identify and approve equipment and elements required for productions, such as scenery, lights, props, costumes, choreography, and music.
  • Establish pace of programs and sequences of scenes according to time requirements and cast and set accessibility.
  • Conduct meetings with staff to discuss production progress and to ensure production objectives are attained.
  • Compile scripts, program notes, and other material related to productions.
  • Perform administrative duties, such as preparing operational reports, distributing rehearsal call sheets and script copies, and arranging for rehearsal quarters.
  • Resolve personnel problems that arise during the production process by acting as liaisons between dissenting parties when necessary.
  • Plan and schedule programming and event coverage, based on broadcast length, time availability, and other factors, such as community needs, ratings data, and viewer demographics.
  • Coordinate activities between departments, such as news and programming.
  • Direct and coordinate activities of personnel engaged in broadcast news, sports, or programming.
  • Monitor and review programming to ensure that schedules are met, guidelines are adhered to, and performances are of adequate quality.
  • Check completed program logs for accuracy and conformance with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules and regulations and resolve program log inaccuracies.
  • Establish work schedules and assign work to staff members.
  • Monitor network transmissions for advisories concerning daily program schedules, program content, special feeds, or program changes.
  • Prepare copy and edit tape so that material is ready for broadcasting.
  • Confer with directors and production staff to discuss issues, such as production and casting problems, budgets, policies, and news coverage.
  • Develop ideas for programs and features that a station could produce.
  • Evaluate new and existing programming to assess suitability and the need for changes, using information such as audience surveys and feedback.
  • Develop promotions for current programs and specials.
  • Perform personnel duties, such as hiring staff and evaluating work performance.
  • Act as a liaison between talent and directors, providing information that performers or guests need to prepare for appearances and communicating relevant information from guests, performers, or staff to directors.
  • Review information about programs and schedules to ensure accuracy and provide such information to local media outlets.
  • Select, acquire, and maintain programs, music, films, and other needed materials and obtain legal clearances for their use as necessary.
  • Audition and interview performers to match their attributes to specific roles or to increase the pool of available acting talent.
  • Prepare actors for auditions by providing scripts and information about roles and casting requirements.
  • Select performers for roles or submit lists of suitable performers to producers or directors for final selection.
  • Contact agents and actors to provide notification of audition and performance opportunities and to set up audition times.
  • Serve as liaisons between directors, actors, and agents.
  • Negotiate contract agreements with performers, with agents, or between performers and agents or production companies.
  • Arrange for or design screen tests or auditions for prospective performers.
  • Review performer information, such as photos, resumes, voice tapes, videos, and union membership, to decide whom to audition for parts.
  • Maintain talent files that include information such as performers’ specialties, past performances, and availability.
  • Read scripts and confer with producers to determine the types and numbers of performers required for a given production.
  • Attend or view productions to maintain knowledge of available actors.
  • Switch between video sources in a studio or on multi-camera remotes, using equipment such as switchers, video slide projectors, and video effects generators.
  • Observe pictures through monitors and direct camera and video staff concerning shading and composition.
  • Supervise and assign duties to workers engaged in technical control and production of radio and television programs.
  • Monitor broadcasts to ensure that programs conform to station or network policies and regulations.
  • Operate equipment to produce programs or broadcast live programs from remote locations.
  • Test equipment to ensure proper operation.
  • Train workers in use of equipment, such as switchers, cameras, monitors, microphones, and lights.
  • Act as liaisons between engineering and production departments.
  • Collaborate with promotions directors to produce on-air station promotions.
  • Confer with operations directors to formulate and maintain fair and attainable technical policies for programs.
  • Schedule use of studio and editing facilities for producers and engineering and maintenance staff.

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What other tasks a Producers and Directors may have

  • Arrange financing for productions.

  • Perform management activities, such as budgeting, scheduling, planning, and marketing.
  • Compose and edit scripts or provide screenwriters with story outlines from which scripts can be written.
  • Negotiate with parties, including independent producers and the distributors and broadcasters who will be handling completed productions.
  • Cut and edit film or tape to integrate component parts into desired sequences.
  • Choose settings and locations for films and determine how scenes will be shot in these settings.
  • Review film daily to check on work in progress and to plan for future filming.
  • Obtain rights to scripts or to such items as existing video footage.
  • Write and submit proposals to bid on contracts for projects.
  • Develop marketing plans for finished products, collaborating with sales associates to supervise product distribution.
  • Operate and maintain on-air and production audio equipment.
  • Develop budgets for programming and broadcasting activities and monitor expenditures to ensure that they remain within budgetary limits.
  • Read news, read or record public service and promotional announcements, or perform other on-air duties.
  • Direct setup of remote facilities and install or cancel programs at remote stations.
  • Conduct interviews for broadcasts.
  • Cue announcers, actors, performers, and guests.
  • Participate in the planning and execution of fundraising activities.
  • Direct shows, productions, and plays.
  • Hire and supervise workers who help locate people with specified attributes and talents.
  • Teach acting classes.
  • Locate performers or extras for crowd and background scenes, and stand-ins or photo doubles for actors, by direct contact or through agents.
  • Direct technical aspects of newscasts and other productions, checking and switching between video sources and taking responsibility for the on-air product, including camera shots and graphics.
  • Follow instructions from production managers and directors during productions, such as commands for camera cuts, effects, graphics, and takes.
  • Set up and execute video transitions and special effects, such as fades, dissolves, cuts, keys, and supers, using computers to manipulate pictures as necessary.
  • Discuss filter options, lens choices, and the visual effects of objects being filmed with photography directors and video operators.

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Top reasons to use time tracking for Producers and Directors

Organize your paperwork and comply with legal requirements

Use Monitask for complete control over your employees' working hours and get information about the hours worked in the form of convenient reports.
Demonstrating the total number of hours spent each year helps support your business and increases transparency with your customers.

Receive more grants and investments

Proper time calculations will ensure that you have supporting documents and data to show when you apply for investments or search for new strategic partners.

Save on payroll and identify bottlenecks

Review daily timesheets and productivity scores to identify bottlenecks and ways to improve your operations quickly.
Implementing the correct time-tracking solution always results in reduced payroll costs for part-time and full-time employees, and companies can get more things done for each dollar they invest in their recruitment efforts.

Improve staffing and scheduling

Scheduling takes the guesswork out of the project's management.
By reviewing scheduling reports, managers can quickly identify efforts and estimated the workforce needed to complete the projects on time.

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