How Conservation Scientists stay on track

Time cards for professionals
Conservation Scientists hourly rate: $30,78

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What is the job of the Conservation Scientists

Manage, improve, and protect natural resources to maximize their use without damaging the environment. May conduct soil surveys and develop plans to eliminate soil erosion or to protect rangelands. May instruct farmers, agricultural production managers, or ranchers in best ways to use crop rotation, contour plowing, or terracing to conserve soil and water; in the number and kind of livestock and forage plants best suited to particular ranges; and in range and farm improvements, such as fencing and reservoirs for stock watering.

Key tasks of the Conservation Scientists

  • Implement soil or water management techniques, such as nutrient management, erosion control, buffers, or filter strips, in accordance with conservation plans.

  • Advise land users, such as farmers or ranchers, on plans, problems, or alternative conservation solutions.
  • Monitor projects during or after construction to ensure projects conform to design specifications.
  • Visit areas affected by erosion problems to identify causes or determine solutions.
  • Develop or maintain working relationships with local government staff or board members.
  • Apply principles of specialized fields of science, such as agronomy, soil science, forestry, or agriculture, to achieve conservation objectives.
  • Gather information from geographic information systems (GIS) databases or applications to formulate land use recommendations.
  • Compute design specifications for implementation of conservation practices, using survey or field information, technical guides or engineering manuals.
  • Participate on work teams to plan, develop, or implement programs or policies for improving environmental habitats, wetlands, or groundwater or soil resources.
  • Conduct fact-finding or mediation sessions among government units, landowners, or other agencies to resolve disputes.
  • Revisit land users to view implemented land use practices or plans.
  • Respond to complaints or questions on wetland jurisdiction, providing information or clarification.
  • Compute cost estimates of different conservation practices, based on needs of land users, maintenance requirements, or life expectancy of practices.
  • Provide information, knowledge, expertise, or training to government agencies at all levels to solve water or soil management problems or to assure coordination of resource protection activities.
  • Analyze results of investigations to determine measures needed to maintain or restore proper soil management.
  • Coordinate or implement technical, financial, or administrative assistance programs for local government units to ensure efficient program implementation or timely responses to requests for assistance.
  • Identify or recommend integrated weed and pest management (IPM) strategies, such as resistant plants, cultural or behavioral controls, soil amendments, insects, natural enemies, barriers, or pesticides.
  • Review proposed wetland restoration easements or provide technical recommendations.
  • Develop, conduct, or participate in surveys, studies, or investigations of various land uses to inform corrective action plans.
  • Regulate grazing, such as by issuing permits and checking for compliance with standards, and help ranchers plan and organize grazing systems to manage, improve, protect, and maximize the use of rangelands.
  • Manage forage resources through fire, herbicide use, or revegetation to maintain a sustainable yield from the land.
  • Coordinate with federal land managers and other agencies and organizations to manage and protect rangelands.
  • Measure and assess vegetation resources for biological assessment companies, environmental impact statements, and rangeland monitoring programs.
  • Maintain soil stability and vegetation for non-grazing uses, such as wildlife habitats and outdoor recreation.
  • Study grazing patterns to determine number and kind of livestock that can be most profitably grazed and to determine the best grazing seasons.
  • Offer advice to rangeland users on water management, forage production methods, and control of brush.
  • Plan and direct construction and maintenance of range improvements, such as fencing, corrals, stock-watering reservoirs, and soil-erosion control structures.
  • Mediate agreements among rangeland users and preservationists as to appropriate land use and management.
  • Study rangeland management practices and research range problems to provide sustained production of forage, livestock, and wildlife.
  • Tailor conservation plans to landowners’ goals, such as livestock support, wildlife, or recreation.
  • Develop technical standards and specifications used to manage, protect, and improve the natural resources of range lands and related grazing lands.
  • Plan and implement revegetation of disturbed sites.
  • Study forage plants and their growth requirements to determine varieties best suited to particular range.
  • Conduct field trips to point out scientific, historic, and natural features of parks, forests, historic sites, or other attractions.
  • Prepare and present illustrated lectures and interpretive talks about park features.
  • Plan and organize public events at the park.
  • Provide visitor services, such as explaining regulations, answering visitor requests, needs and complaints, and providing information about the park and surrounding areas.
  • Develop environmental educational programs and curricula for schools.
  • Research stories regarding the area’s natural history or environment.
  • Perform emergency duties to protect human life, government property, and natural features of park.
  • Confer with park staff to determine subjects and schedules for park programs.
  • Assist with operations of general facilities, such as visitor centers.
  • Plan and develop audio-visual devices for public programs.
  • Construct historical, scientific, and nature visitor-center displays.
  • Prepare brochures and write newspaper articles.
  • Compile and maintain official park photographic and information files.
  • Take photographs and motion pictures for use in lectures and publications and to develop displays.
  • Interview specialists in desired fields to obtain and develop data for park information programs.

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What other tasks a Conservation Scientists may have

  • Manage field offices or involve staff in cooperative ventures.

  • Plan soil management or conservation practices, such as crop rotation, reforestation, permanent vegetation, contour plowing, or terracing, to maintain soil or conserve water.
  • Initiate, schedule, or conduct annual audits or compliance checks of program implementation by local government.
  • Develop water conservation or harvest plans, using weather information systems, irrigation information management systems, or other sources of daily evapotranspiration (ET) data.
  • Review or approve amendments to comprehensive local water plans or conservation district plans.
  • Develop or conduct environmental studies, such as plant material field trials or wildlife habitat impact studies.
  • Enter local soil, water, or other environmental data into adaptive or Web-based decision tools to identify appropriate analyses or techniques.
  • Compile or interpret biodata to determine extent or type of wetlands or to aid in program formulation.
  • Review annual reports of counties, conservation districts, or watershed management organizations, certifying compliance with mandated reporting requirements.
  • Review grant applications or make funding recommendations.
  • Manage private livestock operations.
  • Develop methods for protecting range from fire and rodent damage and for controlling poisonous plants.
  • Develop new and improved instruments and techniques for activities, such as range reseeding.
  • Plan, organize and direct activities of seasonal staff members.
  • Survey park to determine forest conditions and distribution and abundance of fauna and flora.
  • Perform routine maintenance on park structures.

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Top reasons to use time tracking for Conservation Scientists

Organize your paperwork and comply with legal requirements

Use Monitask for complete control over your employees' working hours and get information about the hours worked in the form of convenient reports.
Demonstrating the total number of hours spent each year helps support your business and increases transparency with your customers.

Receive more grants and investments

Proper time calculations will ensure that you have supporting documents and data to show when you apply for investments or search for new strategic partners.

Save on payroll and identify bottlenecks

Review daily timesheets and productivity scores to identify bottlenecks and ways to improve your operations quickly.
Implementing the correct time-tracking solution always results in reduced payroll costs for part-time and full-time employees, and companies can get more things done for each dollar they invest in their recruitment efforts.

Improve staffing and scheduling

Scheduling takes the guesswork out of the project's management.
By reviewing scheduling reports, managers can quickly identify efforts and estimated the workforce needed to complete the projects on time.

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