How Registered Nurses stay on track

Time tracking for your processes
Registered Nurses hourly rate: $36,22

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What is the job of the Registered Nurses

Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing care plans, and maintain medical records. Administer nursing care to ill, injured, convalescent, or disabled patients. May advise patients on health maintenance and disease prevention or provide case management. Licensing or registration required.

Key tasks of the Registered Nurses

  • Maintain accurate, detailed reports and records.

  • Administer medications to patients and monitor patients for reactions or side effects.
  • Record patients’ medical information and vital signs.
  • Monitor, record, and report symptoms or changes in patients’ conditions.
  • Consult and coordinate with healthcare team members to assess, plan, implement, or evaluate patient care plans.
  • Modify patient treatment plans as indicated by patients’ responses and conditions.
  • Monitor all aspects of patient care, including diet and physical activity.
  • Direct or supervise less-skilled nursing or healthcare personnel or supervise a particular unit.
  • Prepare patients for and assist with examinations or treatments.
  • Instruct individuals, families, or other groups on topics such as health education, disease prevention, or childbirth and develop health improvement programs.
  • Assess the needs of individuals, families, or communities, including assessment of individuals’ home or work environments, to identify potential health or safety problems.
  • Prepare rooms, sterile instruments, equipment, or supplies and ensure that stock of supplies is maintained.
  • Refer students or patients to specialized health resources or community agencies furnishing assistance.
  • Consult with institutions or associations regarding issues or concerns relevant to the practice and profession of nursing.
  • Perform emergency medical procedures, such as basic cardiac life support (BLS), advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), and other condition-stabilizing interventions.
  • Manage patients’ pain relief and sedation by providing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, monitoring patients’ responses, and changing care plans accordingly.
  • Document data related to patients’ care, including assessment results, interventions, medications, patient responses, or treatment changes.
  • Diagnose acute or chronic conditions that could result in rapid physiological deterioration or life-threatening instability.
  • Administer blood and blood product transfusions or intravenous infusions, monitoring patients for adverse reactions.
  • Assess urgent and emergent health conditions, using both physiologically and technologically derived data.
  • Assess the impact of illnesses or injuries on patients’ health, function, growth, development, nutrition, sleep, rest, quality of life, or family, social and educational relationships.
  • Interpret information obtained from electrocardiograms (EKGs) or radiographs (x-rays).
  • Obtain specimens or samples for laboratory work.
  • Collaborate with patients to plan for future health care needs or to coordinate transitions and referrals.
  • Refer patients for specialty consultations or treatments.
  • Set up, operate, or monitor invasive equipment and devices, such as colostomy or tracheotomy equipment, mechanical ventilators, catheters, gastrointestinal tubes, and central lines.
  • Discuss illnesses and treatments with patients and family members.
  • Distinguish between normal and abnormal developmental and age-related physiological and behavioral changes in acute, critical, and chronic illness.
  • Collaborate with members of multidisciplinary health care teams to plan, manage, or assess patient treatments.
  • Assess the needs of patients’ family members or caregivers.
  • Perform administrative duties that facilitate admission, transfer, or discharge of patients.
  • Provide formal and informal education to other staff members.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, and participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in acute care.
  • Treat wounds or superficial lacerations.
  • Participate in patients’ care meetings and conferences.
  • Participate in the development of practice protocols.
  • Monitor patients’ medication usage and results.
  • Document patients’ medical and psychological histories, physical assessment results, diagnoses, treatment plans, prescriptions, or outcomes.
  • Diagnose psychiatric disorders and mental health conditions.
  • Evaluate patients’ behavior to formulate diagnoses or assess treatments.
  • Distinguish between physiologically and psychologically based disorders and diagnose appropriately.
  • Assess patients’ mental and physical status based on the presenting symptoms and complaints.
  • Educate patients and family members about mental health and medical conditions, preventive health measures, medications, or treatment plans.
  • Write prescriptions for psychotropic medications as allowed by state regulations and collaborative practice agreements.
  • Collaborate with interdisciplinary team members, including psychiatrists, psychologists, or nursing staff, to develop, implement, or evaluate treatment plans.
  • Develop and implement treatment plans.
  • Participate in activities aimed at professional growth and development including conferences or continuing education activities.
  • Conduct individual, group, or family psychotherapy for those with chronic or acute mental disorders.
  • Interpret diagnostic or laboratory tests such as electrocardiograms (EKGs) and renal functioning tests.
  • Consult with psychiatrists or other professionals when unusual or complex cases are encountered.
  • Participate in treatment team conferences regarding diagnosis or treatment of difficult cases.
  • Develop practice protocols for mental health problems based on review and evaluation of published research.
  • Refer patients requiring more specialized or complex treatment to psychiatrists, primary care physicians, or other medical specialists.
  • Develop, implement, or evaluate programs such as outreach activities, community mental health programs, and crisis situation response activities.
  • Teach classes in mental health topics such as stress reduction.
  • Administer medications including those administered by injection.
  • Monitor the use and status of medical and pharmaceutical supplies.
  • Evaluate patients’ vital signs or laboratory data to determine emergency intervention needs.
  • Monitor patients for changes in status and indications of conditions such as sepsis or shock and institute appropriate interventions.
  • Set up and monitor medical equipment and devices such as cardiac monitors, mechanical ventilators and alarms, oxygen delivery devices, transducers, or pressure lines.
  • Administer medications intravenously, by injection, orally, through gastric tubes, or by other methods.
  • Assess patients’ pain levels or sedation requirements.
  • Conduct pulmonary assessments to identify abnormal respiratory patterns or breathing sounds that indicate problems.
  • Monitor patients’ fluid intake and output to detect emerging problems, such as fluid and electrolyte imbalances.
  • Document patients’ medical histories and assessment findings.
  • Prioritize nursing care for assigned critically ill patients, based on assessment data or identified needs.
  • Compile and analyze data obtained from monitoring or diagnostic tests.
  • Administer blood and blood products, monitoring patients for signs and symptoms related to transfusion reactions.
  • Assist physicians with procedures such as bronchoscopy, endoscopy, endotracheal intubation, or elective cardioversion.
  • Collaborate with other health care professionals to develop and revise treatment plans, based on identified needs and assessment data.
  • Collect specimens for laboratory tests.
  • Document patients’ treatment plans, interventions, outcomes, or plan revisions.
  • Identify malfunctioning equipment or devices.
  • Advocate for patients’ and families’ needs, or provide emotional support for patients and their families.
  • Perform approved therapeutic or diagnostic procedures, based upon patients’ clinical status.
  • Identify patients at risk of complications due to nutritional status.
  • Assess patients’ psychosocial status and needs, including areas such as sleep patterns, anxiety, grief, anger, and support systems.
  • Assess family adaptation levels and coping skills to determine whether intervention is needed.
  • Ensure that equipment or devices are properly stored after use.
  • Coordinate patient care conferences.
  • Identify patients’ age-specific needs and alter care plans as necessary to meet those needs.
  • Supervise and monitor unit nursing staff.
  • Participate in professional organizations and continuing education to improve practice knowledge and skills.
  • Participate in the development, review, or evaluation of nursing practice protocols.
  • Plan, provide, or evaluate educational programs for nursing staff, interdisciplinary health care team members, or community members.
  • Provide post-mortem care.
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of nursing practice or organizational systems.
  • Collaborate with other health care professionals and service providers to ensure optimal patient care.
  • Develop and maintain departmental policies, procedures, objectives, or patient care standards, based on evidence-based practice guidelines or expert opinion.
  • Develop nursing service philosophies, goals, policies, priorities, or procedures.
  • Direct or supervise nursing care staff in the provision of patient therapy.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, or participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in nursing.
  • Instruct nursing staff in areas such as the assessment, development, implementation, and evaluation of disability, illness, management, technology, or resources.
  • Provide coaching and mentoring to other caregivers to help facilitate their professional growth and development.
  • Provide consultation to other health care providers in areas such as patient discharge, patient care, or clinical procedures.
  • Develop, implement, or evaluate standards of nursing practice in specialty area, such as pediatrics, acute care, and geriatrics.
  • Maintain departmental policies, procedures, objectives, or infection control standards.
  • Make clinical recommendations to physicians, other health care providers, insurance companies, patients, or health care organizations.
  • Develop or assist others in development of care and treatment plans.
  • Plan, evaluate, or modify treatment programs, based on information gathered by observing and interviewing patients or by analyzing patient records.
  • Provide specialized direct and indirect care to inpatients and outpatients within a designated specialty, such as obstetrics, neurology, oncology, or neonatal care.
  • Monitor or evaluate medical conditions of patients in collaboration with other health care professionals.
  • Design evaluation programs regarding the quality and effectiveness of nursing practice or organizational systems.
  • Coordinate or conduct educational programs or in-service training sessions on topics, such as clinical procedures.
  • Observe, interview, and assess patients to identify care needs.
  • Lead nursing department implementation of, or compliance with, regulatory or accreditation processes.
  • Present clients with information required to make informed health care and treatment decisions.
  • Participate in clinical research projects, such as by reviewing protocols, reviewing patient records, monitoring compliance, and meeting with regulatory authorities.
  • Chair nursing departments or committees.
  • Design patient education programs that include information required to make informed health care and treatment decisions.
  • Provide direct care by performing comprehensive health assessments, developing differential diagnoses, conducting specialized tests, or prescribing medications or treatments.
  • Prepare reports to document patients’ care activities.
  • Write nursing orders.
  • Identify training needs or conduct training sessions for nursing students or medical staff.
  • Perform discharge planning for patients.
  • Teach patient education programs that include information required to make informed health care and treatment decisions.

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What other tasks a Registered Nurses may have

  • Inform physician of patient’s condition during anesthesia.

  • Administer local, inhalation, intravenous, or other anesthetics.
  • Provide health care, first aid, immunizations, or assistance in convalescence or rehabilitation in locations such as schools, hospitals, or industry.
  • Hand items to surgeons during operations.
  • Observe nurses and visit patients to ensure proper nursing care.
  • Conduct specified laboratory tests.
  • Direct or coordinate infection control programs, advising or consulting with specified personnel about necessary precautions.
  • Engage in research activities related to nursing.
  • Prescribe or recommend drugs, medical devices, or other forms of treatment, such as physical therapy, inhalation therapy, or related therapeutic procedures.
  • Order, interpret, and evaluate diagnostic tests to identify and assess patient’s condition.
  • Perform physical examinations, make tentative diagnoses, and treat patients en route to hospitals or at disaster site triage centers.
  • Perform administrative or managerial functions, such as taking responsibility for a unit’s staff, budget, planning, or long-range goals.
  • Provide or arrange for training or instruction of auxiliary personnel or students.
  • Work with individuals, groups, or families to plan or implement programs designed to improve the overall health of communities.
  • Adjust settings on patients’ assistive devices, such as temporary pacemakers.
  • Prescribe medications and observe patients’ reactions, modifying prescriptions as needed.
  • Order, perform, or interpret the results of diagnostic tests and screening procedures based on assessment results, differential diagnoses, and knowledge about age, gender and health status of clients.
  • Analyze the indications, contraindications, risk complications, and cost-benefit tradeoffs of therapeutic interventions.
  • Assist patients in organizing their health care system activities.
  • Provide routine physical health screenings to detect or monitor problems such as heart disease and diabetes.
  • Treat patients for routine physical health problems.
  • Direct or provide home health services.

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Top reasons to use time tracking for Registered Nurses

Organize your paperwork and comply with legal requirements

Use Monitask for complete control over your employees' working hours and get information about the hours worked in the form of convenient reports.
Demonstrating the total number of hours spent each year helps support your business and increases transparency with your customers.

Receive more grants and investments

Proper time calculations will ensure that you have supporting documents and data to show when you apply for investments or search for new strategic partners.

Save on payroll and identify bottlenecks

Review daily timesheets and productivity scores to identify bottlenecks and ways to improve your operations quickly.
Implementing the correct time-tracking solution always results in reduced payroll costs for part-time and full-time employees, and companies can get more things done for each dollar they invest in their recruitment efforts.

Improve staffing and scheduling

Scheduling takes the guesswork out of the project's management.
By reviewing scheduling reports, managers can quickly identify efforts and estimated the workforce needed to complete the projects on time.

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